Woody Allen: A Documentary - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Woody Allen: A Documentary Reviews

Page 1 of 6
December 18, 2016
Lots of good stuff here. If you love quirky comedy and self-deprecation then this is perfect.
July 12, 2015
mestre Allan Stewart Königsberg <3
April 17, 2015
Năo apresenta nada de novo. Mas ainda assim diverte demais.
December 14, 2014
Exceptionally well done.
Super Reviewer
½ December 10, 2014
An enjoyable biography that is also, quite unfortunately, too safe to be memorable, and it doesn't help that the second part skips many of Allen's films to focus on his "best moments" after 1980, preventing this from being an essential documentary about him.
September 2, 2014
A true, faithful, and characteristic denotável portrait diary of one of the most beloved masters of cinema: Woody Allen. Here, the director reveals not only its great history behind the camera as well as on camera, such as your relationships with your audience and your work. The film shows not only the history but the history, success and fall of one of the greatest filmmakers of all time. Brilliant!
August 31, 2014
Review:
I haven't seen a lot of Woody Allen's movies and the ones that I have seen, I wasn't that impressed with, but I've always wondered why big actors always wanted star in his films. After watching this 2 disk documentary, I still don't know what so amazing about the way that he directs or his writing. I'm not a big fan of his style of comedy and his movies seem to work off of dialogue which I don't find that amusing. His movies never make that much money, which is quite weird because he is highly respected by many actors and actresses in his field. After watching the documentary I've noticed that he is a very humble man who takes his art seriously and he's not caught up in all the Hollywood hype, which is good to see after all of his fame. Anyway, this movie hasn't really drawn me to delve into his Filmography and I don't feel like I've Iearnt anything about the meaning behind his warped sense of humour, but its a well made documentary which does get a bit boring after a while but it covers quite a bit. Average!

Round-Up:
There are many A-listers in this documentary who have many great things to say about this veteran actor/director/writer who has a unique style to making films. In this documentary, the director touched on his personal life which got tarnished after he left his wife for his adopted daughter. It will be a shame if he gets remembered for that more than his movies. Anyway, I did struggle to stay awake through the film because of the humble tone and the fact that no one has a bad word to say about him, which is a god thing really. The film primarily is about his work and the though behind each film which is uninteresting if you haven't seen a lot of his movies. Its basically made for his die hard fans who have grown up with his movies and who understand his sense of humour, which I don't. I might give some of his more serious work a watch but I'm still not drawn to his more comedic movies.

I recommend this movie to people who are into Woody Allen's work and the many different actors/actresses that he has worked with. 4/10
August 18, 2014
It's a collaborative effort with Woody (who, unusually, looks happy to be interviewed), so we see him at home (showing off a typewriter he bought for $40 at 16), writing on his bed and standing outside his childhood home in Brooklyn. Allen is endearing in his belief that any of his success has been a happy accident and that he has yet to make a great film that will stand the test of time.
½ June 29, 2014
A pleasure to watch...
June 2, 2014
A true, faithful, and characteristic denotável portrait diary of one of the most beloved masters of cinema: Woody Allen. Here, the director reveals not only its great history behind the camera as well as on camera, such as your relationships with your audience and your work. The film shows not only the history but the history, success and fall of one of the greatest filmmakers of all time. Brilliant!
½ April 30, 2014
I Love Most, If Not All Of Woody's Yearly Escapades Into Story Telling. His Take On Life Is Just So Unique. He Is A Fantastic Observer Of Life & A Bit Of A Modern Day Shakespeare, Based In New York. ;-)
½ April 5, 2014
It's the first time I've seen so many significant people in Woody Allen's life talking about him.
March 24, 2014
I first saw the second half of this documentary when I worked for a PBS station, and I had only seen maybe one Allen film. I'm not even sure if I had seen that film before or after I saw this. Anyhow, I eventually saw "Annie Hall" and "Manhattan" and I finally decided to check this out from beginning to end. It is a great look and the life and career of Allen from his childhood all the way through his long career. It made me appreciate how much he has done, and made me want to watch everything he has done, and will do.
Billie P.
Super Reviewer
March 24, 2014
This Woody Allen documentary is about Woody Allen as a filmmaker and some of the larger themes that are played out in his films. It is a tad bit light on biography, so if you're looking for that, you won't find that here.
March 9, 2014
Slightly disheveled this director shows a little-known facet of Woody Allen as a director, actor and musician, among other things. This work is a great contribution to a better understanding of the work of Woody Allen.
March 7, 2014
the best director, actor , writter etc
December 25, 2013
Woody Allen: A Documentary (2011)
December 6, 2013
I hadn't expected Woody Allen's full participation in this documentary (or any documentary), given his often-discussed need for privacy (and the inevitable discussion of his private life). However, that's probably why this is a bit of a puff piece. There is a more-or-less detailed discussion of his early career and gag-focused films and then his shift into "mature" material with Annie Hall. Then, onward into the mixed bag of films that appeared in the 80s and 90s, but with little extended treatment of each one. After that, the documentary starts to jump around and at least one talking head mentions decline or drift (after Deconstructing Harry, which gets no discussion at all) - up until Match Point and his renewal. A coda talks about the success of Midnight in Paris. Throughout it all, Allen professes that he doesn't think any of his films are good and that he'll never have a masterpiece. An interview in the disc's extras suggests that he doesn't care. It seems pretty apparent that he's worked out his themes in the past (as there is pretty much no discussion of themes or content after Crimes and Misdemeanors) and now he's just a craftsman (or an actor's director). Probably that's true, but it's hard to know whether you are going to get a dud or something richer (from anywhere in his oeuvre). Way back when, I would have expected better.
November 25, 2013
Everybody loves Woody.
Page 1 of 6