Esquire Magazine

Tomatometer-approved publication
Rating Title/Year Author
Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) (2020) Gabrielle Bruney Amid the movie's fun, if at times ham-handed girl power moments, and artfully choreographed fight scenes, this scene stands out for its serious-minded and affecting portrayal of sexual harassment. EDIT
Posted Feb 11, 2021
To the Ends of the Earth (2019) Nick Schager Kiyoshi Kurosawa conjures an atmosphere of humorous dislocation and acute fear with To the Ends of the Earth... EDIT
Posted Jan 27, 2021
Beanpole (2019) Nick Schager Dramas don't come much bleaker than Beanpole, director Kantemir Balagov's wrenching story about the damage caused by war, and the exceedingly high cost of survival. EDIT
Posted Jan 27, 2021
Shirley (2020) Nick Schager Despair, desire, and madness are all entangled in Josephine Decker's Shirley... EDIT
Posted Jan 27, 2021
Driveways (2019) Nick Schager Driveways isn't simply one of the late Brian Dennehy's final performances-it's also one of his finest. EDIT
Posted Jan 27, 2021
Apocalypse '45 (2020) Nick Schager Thrillingly grand and revealingly intimate, it paints a timely portrait of the heroism, and sacrifices, required to uphold democracy. EDIT
Posted Jan 27, 2021
Ma Rainey's Black Bottom (2020) Nick Schager Acting doesn't come much bolder and more blistering than in Ma Rainey's Black Bottom. EDIT
Posted Jan 27, 2021
Young Ahmed (2019) Nick Schager The directors' aesthetics are as formally rigorous and evocative as ever, capturing the unyielding nature of zealotry, as well as the difficulty of loosening extremism's terrible grip on individuals' hearts and minds. EDIT
Posted Jan 27, 2021
Nomad: In the Footsteps of Bruce Chatwin (2019) Nick Schager Though the director employs considerable archival material, its footage of his own journeys - set to Ernst Reijseger's eclectic score - that really gets to the heart of Chatwin EDIT
Posted Jan 27, 2021
The Whistlers (2019) Nick Schager The director orchestrates his action with slippery subtlety and droll humor, and he continually surprises on his way to an expressively non-verbal finale of light and music. EDIT
Posted Jan 27, 2021
The Dark and the Wicked (2020) Nick Schager Cast in funereal grays and blacks, and aided by lead performances that do much with minimal gestures, it's a nightmare... EDIT
Posted Jan 26, 2021
Dick Johnson Is Dead (2020) Nick Schager Dick Johnson is Dead is a daring masterpiece about the loss of loved ones, and of memory, and the movies' ability-and, also, inability-to make the impermanent permanent. EDIT
Posted Jan 26, 2021
I'm Thinking of Ending Things (2020) Nick Schager It's a masterwork of unhinged tone, as well as a showcase for Buckley, whose grand performance covers an expansive stretch of emotional terrain. EDIT
Posted Jan 26, 2021
The Painted Bird (2019) Nick Schager Few films are this tough to sit through-or difficult to forget. EDIT
Posted Jan 26, 2021
Nomadland (2020) Nick Schager Zhao's film is a a poetic Malickian ode to the pioneering nature of the restless American spirit. EDIT
Posted Jan 26, 2021
Songbird (2020) Brady Langmann We don't need a Purge-like thriller using this trauma as nightmare fuel. EDIT
Posted Dec 11, 2020
Iverson (2014) John Hendrickson There's no clear-cut answer, but Beatty's film succeeds in that it shows you how kids, particularly young, African-American boys, are a product of their environment. EDIT
Posted Nov 10, 2020
The Beginning or the End (1947) Jack Moffitt The Beginning or the End is a masterful movie which tells the most dramatic story of our time with true power and suspense. EDIT
Posted Nov 4, 2020
The Homestretch (1947) Jack Moffitt In this picture, Miss O'Hara starts acting. It's a little early to announce the results of this experiment. But she and Mr. Wilde have a bedroom scene that really arouses emotion and that, they tell me, is the primary intention of acting. EDIT
Posted Nov 4, 2020
Great Expectations (1946) Jack Moffitt The British director, David Lean, is the real star of this offering. Formerly an imitator of stage techniques, he proves himself a real movie virtuoso. EDIT
Posted Oct 20, 2020
Down to Earth (1947) Jack Moffitt A silly story with lavish Technicolor extravaganza contrives to make a fairly entertaining musical. EDIT
Posted Oct 20, 2020
Desert Fury (1947) Jack Moffitt It's as modern as the casino at Las Vegas and as rugged as the Battle of the Little Big Horn. EDIT
Posted Oct 20, 2020
The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer (1947) Jack Moffitt It's one of the happiest of the season's comedies and as appropriate to August relaxation as a mint julep and a porch swing. EDIT
Posted Oct 20, 2020
Possessed (1947) Jack Moffitt It required great courage for Joan Crawford to play it and for Warner Brothers to produce it. The screen's never exhibited so ruthless a study of an undisciplined mind at work. EDIT
Posted Oct 20, 2020
The Green Years (1946) Jack Moffitt If you love the theatre and actors, it does your heart good to see a performer of Mr. Coburn's talents get a break in a stellar role. EDIT
Posted Oct 20, 2020
The Perfect Marriage (1946) Jack Moffitt You'd better see The Perfect Marriage. It comes pretty close to being the perfect comedy. EDIT
Posted Oct 20, 2020
Caesar and Cleopatra (1945) Jack Moffitt Claude Rains in the role of Caesar, and Vivien Leigh, as Cleopatra, manage to present themselves at the same time as the embodiment of age-old intellectual forces and as fascinating individuals. EDIT
Posted Oct 20, 2020
What the Constitution Means to Me (2020) Adrienne Westenfeld Rarely has a play been so miraculously timed as this one, yet the timing goes beyond mere happenstance. EDIT
Posted Oct 19, 2020
Shock (1946) Jack Moffitt A vast studio like Twentieth Century-Fox... seldom can afford to experiment. But, when the budget is held down and young blood is called in, it is interesting to note that even so unwieldy an organization can achieve a rather dull imitation of Gaslight. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
Blue Skies (1946) Jack Moffitt Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire and Joan Caulfield are the inhabitants of this fictional vacuum, and do their best to blow into it a breath of life. Fortunately, their best is pretty good. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
The Jolson Story (1946) Jack Moffitt The Jolson Story says that most show people have the same struggles, the same desire for a home, and the same love of family that motivate other Americans. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
Fiesta (1947) Jack Moffitt You'll find much to like in this tuneful and relaxing Technicolor musical. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
The Two Mrs. Carrolls (1947) Jack Moffitt The play kept experienced theatergoers on the edge of their seats. The picture will keep them on the edge of a nervous breakdown. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
Dear Ruth (1947) Jack Moffitt The hit play becomes a mediocre picture. You can't blame the script. Arthur Sheekman's screenplay retains almost all of Krasna's good dialogue. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
The Perils of Pauline (1947) Jack Moffitt The picture is a triller as well as a thriller, with a bang-up score written by Frank "Praise The Lord and Pass the Ammunition" Loesser. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
My Favorite Brunette (1947) Jack Moffitt It's full of gags and it doesn't try to sabotage anything -- except gloom. In fact it's just the sort of "escapist" entertainment that the Communists find "subversive." Let those who will enjoy it. I did. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
The Farmer's Daughter (1947) Jack Moffitt The Farmer's Daughter is an honestly liberal movie with no concealed jokes. It is thoroughly democratic and thoroughly entertaining. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
Boomerang! (1947) Jack Moffitt The picture is a masterpiece of suspense. Dana Andrews gives another fine performance as the ethical prosecutor. Arthur Kennedy is excellent as the prisoner. Lee J. Cobb is splendid as an honest cop, and Sam Levene does outstanding work as a reporter. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
Welcome Stranger (1947) Jack Moffitt Arthur Sheekman's screenplay is full of funny situations and dialogue. Unlike the screen version of The Late George Apley, Sheekman's screenplay gets its regional laughs not by burlesque and character, but by shrewd interpretive humor. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
It Happened on 5th Avenue (1947) Jack Moffitt There's nothing very original about either the theme or the plot. The idea of a poor man being rich in all-that-matters is as old as is the notion that rich men can be spiritually poor. Yet Del Ruth blends these clichés into a minor masterpiece. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
Stallion Road (1947) Jack Moffitt Anyone can finally make a good picture if he's allowed to make enough bad pictures. Already in Stallion Road Jimmy has made half a good picture. He is on his way. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
The Other Love (1947) Jack Moffitt A chic sadness pervades The Other Love. With the aid of Barbara Stanwyck, David Niven, and a smoothly tailored script, the producer makes death seem fashionable, if not popular. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
Humoresque (1946) Jack Moffitt An artistic triumph that transcends class bias and looks with a compassionate eye upon people of all social groups. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) Jack Moffitt It makes no attempt to oversimplify these millions of individuals into One Composite Veteran. This strong picture presents them as men, matured by combat, who face the problems of readjustment with dignity, courage and patience. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
The Sea of Grass (1947) Jack Moffitt Spencer Tracy, as the rugged individualist, does his best to look monumental and inspired. But the inspiration seldom gets off the ground. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
It's a Wonderful Life (1946) Jack Moffitt Capra enriches his picture with sharp social satire and Dickensesque comments on human behavior. Those who are wearying of Scrooge and Bob Cratchit may find it a closer-to-home version of A Christmas Carol. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
Breakfast in Hollywood (1946) Jack Moffitt From a dramatic standpoint, there isn't a mediocre scene in Breakfast in Hollywood. But, God -- how the audience would welcome one! EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
Sentimental Journey (1946) Jack Moffitt The tear jerker Walter Morosco has produced for Fox is a bath of bathos. It stars Maureen O'Hara -- though it is unfair to blame her for what happened, since she neither wrote, directed nor acted in the picture. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946) Jack Moffitt You sympathize with this unfortunate couple -- although they're murderers. That's why The Postman is a greater picture than Mr. Cain's previous hit, Double Indemnity. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2020
Bill & Ted Face the Music (2020) Chris Nashawaty The message of the movie seems to be that it's never too late to realize those dreams, even the silliest ones. EDIT
Posted Aug 28, 2020