Esquire Magazine

Esquire Magazine is not a Tomatometer-approved publication. Reviews from this publication only count toward the Tomatometer when written by the following Tomatometer-approved critic(s): Jen Chaney, Jordan Hoffman, Judy Berman, Manuel Betancourt, Matt Patches, Nick Schager, Paul Schrodt, Pilot Viruet, Rosie Knight, Stephen Garrett
Rating Title/Year Author
Booksmart (2019) Gabrielle Bruney ...whatever troubles the film has are small, particularly in comparison to the charm and sincerity Molly and Amy share and invite the audience to partake in. EDIT
Posted May 24, 2019
Aladdin (2019) Nick Schager Ritchie failed to bring his signature style to this forgettable Disney reboot. EDIT
Posted May 24, 2019
Pokémon Detective Pikachu (2019) Justin Kirkland [Reynolds] can deliver a snarky line like no one else in Hollywood, and that works, quite incredibly, in Detective Pikachu as well. EDIT
Posted May 17, 2019
Term of Trial (1962) Dwight MacDonald The only interest is in confirming, once more, one's opinion that Laurence Olivier is the best actor now going: he actually gets something out of his cliché part. EDIT
Posted May 8, 2019
The Reluctant Saint (1962) Dwight MacDonald [The] only unexpected factor was Maximilian Schell's performance as the saint: such mugging, such "telegraphing" ... It was hard to believe that this was the actor whose performance I had admired in Judgment at Nuremberg. EDIT
Posted May 8, 2019
How the West Was Won (1962) Dwight MacDonald A buffalo stampede and a raft caught in some terrifying rapids did make their point to my more primitive nerve centers, but the rest was the old stuff directed and acted by the old-stuffers and on a level considerably below their best performances. EDIT
Posted May 8, 2019
The Wrong Arm of the Law (1963) Dwight MacDonald I felt I had been hit over the head by blunt instruments for two hours. EDIT
Posted May 8, 2019
Love and Larceny (1960) Dwight MacDonald Fast-moving, unpretentious and enjoyable. EDIT
Posted May 8, 2019
() Dwight MacDonald Our modern horrors make greater demands, perhaps impossible ones, on the satirist. EDIT
Posted May 8, 2019
The Elusive Corporal (1962) Dwight MacDonald Jean Renoir gives us the World War II equivalent of his Grand Illusion, and how have the mighty fallen! EDIT
Posted May 8, 2019
L'eclisse (1962) Dwight MacDonald It seems to me an almost complete failure; I say "almost" because there were perhaps twenty minutes in which some life breathes. I can think of no such sudden collapse of a major talent. EDIT
Posted May 8, 2019
The Hole (1962) Dwight MacDonald A failure of imagination both ways: too much realism in the tunneling, too little at the end. EDIT
Posted May 7, 2019
The Servant (1963) Dwight MacDonald An attempt to inflate a melodrama into Significance, by pretentious direction, that only succeeded in spoiling it as entertainment. EDIT
Posted May 7, 2019
The Organizer (1963) Dwight MacDonald Marcello Mastroianni is superb in still another new kind of role. With delicacy and restraint he fills in the outlines of a rather complex man, who is personally gentle, humane and inept but ruthlessly efficient as a professional troublemaker. EDIT
Posted May 7, 2019
Jules and Jim (1962) Dwight MacDonald I was constantly being buffeted, shocked, puzzled, and put off by what seemed to me perverse changes of the emotional mood. EDIT
Posted May 6, 2019
Boccaccio '70 (1962) Dwight MacDonald The title is the only clever thing about this trio of duds by famous Italian directors. EDIT
Posted May 6, 2019
Lolita (1962) Dwight MacDonald Lolita is a disappointment because we have a right to expect more from Kubrick (he may come through with his next, which I am told is to be a satirical treatment of the nuclear "defense" problem). EDIT
Posted May 6, 2019
Captain Marvel (2019) Matt Miller Captain Marvel does struggle to break out of the greater MCU. But what counts is that this is a story that manages to re-write the established canon of Marvel history that provides something fresh and new. EDIT
Posted Mar 8, 2019
Harry and Tonto (1974) John Simon The cat acts best, and with condign condescension. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
11 Harrowhouse (1974) John Simon A tenth-rate caper movie. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974) John Simon As one who touted and defended The Wild Bunch and Straw Dogs, I am particularly disheartened. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
The Gambler (1974) John Simon We feel neither Axel's ghastly compulsion nor his intermittent exultation -- granted that he gets very little help from the script. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
California Split (1974) John Simon The movie suffers from Altman's apparently ever more unshakable idiosyncrasies. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
The Stepford Wives (1975) John Simon Sleazy rather than slick. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
Funny Lady (1975) John Simon Ranges from mildly to vastly distasteful. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
At Long Last Love (1975) John Simon [At Long Last Love] may be the worst movie musical of this -- or any -- decade. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
Hearts and Minds (1974) John Simon The faces, intonations, backgrounds of Hearts and Minds -- even its small gestures and sometimes very long pauses -- speak as eloquently as its words. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
The Pedestrian (1974) John Simon A worthy failure. But failure all the same. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
The Great Gatsby (1974) John Simon To a short, sleek novel like Gatsby, where the slight action moves forward like a capricious swimmer, nothing could be more destructive than the slow pace and top-heavy lavishness and overexplicitness. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
Shoot the Piano Player (1960) Dwight MacDonald It is all brilliant and heartless. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
The Virgin Spring (1959) Dwight MacDonald There is too much heavy symbolism and too many stagey groupings, both typical Bergman faults. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
Spartacus (1960) Dwight MacDonald Like a fast back with plenty of power, Kubrick twists and plunges. But he goes down on the twenty-yard line under the sheer weight of the opposition. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
La dolce vita (1960) Dwight MacDonald Dolce Vita is a sensational film, using the word in the dictionary as well as the press agent's meaning. That is, it goes in mostly for effects. Often quite good ones... But still effects. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
L'Avventura (1960) Dwight MacDonald The best picture I've seen since Hiroshima, Mon Amour. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
Rocco and His Brothers (1960) Dwight MacDonald The Idiot has much the same plot line, including the murder, but one believes it because Myshkin is made credible. But Visconti is no Dostoevski. When Rocco tries to go beyond naturalism, it becomes not tragedy but grand opera. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
The Whisperers (1967) Wilfrid Sheed An investigation of this sort into the phenomenology of old age is rare and praiseworthy and an actress who can demonstrate the basic positions is possibly unique... Edith Evans takes the curse off this with a wealth of quirky observation. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
Woman Times Seven (1967) Wilfrid Sheed The film serves as another stake through the career of DeSica. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
The Honey Pot (1967) Wilfrid Sheed Harrison has reached that point in his self-creation where he can turn even a blowsy under-endowed movie like The Honey Pot to his own greater honor and glory. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
The Dirty Dozen (1967) Wilfrid Sheed It must just be taken as another violence-fantasy no better and no worse than a dozen others. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
Privilege (1967) Wilfrid Sheed As social or political comment, the movie is low-level paranoia -- i.e., paranoia that is not even ingenious enough to play along with. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
A Brief Vacation (1975) John Simon It would be nice to be able to report that this charming man, gifted actor, and once outstanding film maker regained at the end that cinematic power that had been steadily seeping away from him. Not so, alas. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
Shampoo (1975) John Simon Everything about Shampoo is vague, attitudinizing, and lacking in true insight. Not one of its characters is worthy of sympathy. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974) John Simon The whole thing is as labored, superficial, and old hat beneath the trendy veneer as anything Hollywood has been grinding out in its pre-Enlightenment decades. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2019
Serenity (2019) Dave Holmes As a movie, I did not love it, but as a reminder to get high and do some squats, I found it useful. EDIT
Posted Jan 31, 2019
() Matt Miller It's like nothing I've ever experienced in a movie, a TV show, on Netflix, or anything else. The user experience is flawless, with viewers making decisions in real time with the story remaining uninterrupted. EDIT
Posted Dec 28, 2018
Aquaman (2018) Matt Miller Aquaman doesn't get close to the triumph of Wonder Woman, but at least it's a step in the right direction of creating a unique, vivid, and at times escapist superhero movie. EDIT
Posted Dec 21, 2018
Creed II (2018) Matt Miller Despite its lack of flair and depth in terms of both storytelling and filmmaking, Creed II does absolutely succeed in being an entertaining boxing movie. EDIT
Posted Nov 21, 2018
Adam Sandler: 100% Fresh (2018) Ben Boskovich From start to finish, 100% Fresh is Adam Sandler at his best. It's a music-heavy special that stays relatable and induces crying on both ends of the spectrum. EDIT
Posted Nov 2, 2018
Weiner (2016) John DeVore Anthony Weiner will be a gross and embarrassing footnote in history, albeit a masterfully documented footnote. EDIT
Posted Oct 19, 2018
The Edge of Seventeen (2016) Jason Diamond You can't go wrong with Kyra Sedgwick and Woody Harrelson in the roles of the film's adults, but Hailee Steinfeld simply shines as Nadine Franklin, and ends up giving us one of the great teenage protagonists in film history. EDIT
Posted Oct 19, 2018