black-ish: Season 5 Reviews

  • Jun 24, 2019

    Ive never seen a more racist show on local TV. If there was a show called "white-ish" it would be banned. All they did was talk about how they needed guns to protect themselves. Complete TRASH that should not be on our TV. Stereotyping at its finest.

    Ive never seen a more racist show on local TV. If there was a show called "white-ish" it would be banned. All they did was talk about how they needed guns to protect themselves. Complete TRASH that should not be on our TV. Stereotyping at its finest.

  • Mar 27, 2019

    The show isn't just funny, it provides great insight about the issues within our communities etc

    The show isn't just funny, it provides great insight about the issues within our communities etc

  • Feb 19, 2019

    Awful show. Not one thing funny about it.

    Awful show. Not one thing funny about it.

  • Jan 04, 2019

    It's one thing if you use generalizations to make lighthearted jokes...it's another if you use them as a foundation for political absolutes.

    It's one thing if you use generalizations to make lighthearted jokes...it's another if you use them as a foundation for political absolutes.

  • Oct 24, 2018

    It is still the best family comedy on TV. And one of the best comedy's on TV period.

    It is still the best family comedy on TV. And one of the best comedy's on TV period.

  • Jul 08, 2018

    Previously, Blackish provided a near-perfect blend of humour, family-fun and cultural awareness. However, Season 5 fails to further these characters in meaningful ways and, in fact, often does the opposite to afford cheap laughs. That said, most of the jokes still land and the cultural commentary is still welcome. In addition, Anthony Anderson’s workplace drama is the best part of the show, specifically Deon Cole’s Charlie Telphy (and Jenifer Lewis’s Ruby Johnson). However, the plot lines are repetitive and dull. Perhaps, most importantly, these characters haven’t grown since the last season to the extent that they have become genuinely unlikeable. The two lead characters, Tracee Ellis-Ross’s Rainbow and Anthony Anderson’s Dre, are some of the most irritating and unpleasant characters on television. This season manages (barely) to find itself through a few good performances and humour but, Blackish is headed for extinction.

    Previously, Blackish provided a near-perfect blend of humour, family-fun and cultural awareness. However, Season 5 fails to further these characters in meaningful ways and, in fact, often does the opposite to afford cheap laughs. That said, most of the jokes still land and the cultural commentary is still welcome. In addition, Anthony Anderson’s workplace drama is the best part of the show, specifically Deon Cole’s Charlie Telphy (and Jenifer Lewis’s Ruby Johnson). However, the plot lines are repetitive and dull. Perhaps, most importantly, these characters haven’t grown since the last season to the extent that they have become genuinely unlikeable. The two lead characters, Tracee Ellis-Ross’s Rainbow and Anthony Anderson’s Dre, are some of the most irritating and unpleasant characters on television. This season manages (barely) to find itself through a few good performances and humour but, Blackish is headed for extinction.