Sicario: Day of the Soldado (2018) - Rotten Tomatoes

Sicario: Day of the Soldado (2018)

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Critic Consensus: Though less subversive than its predecessor, Sicario: Day of the Soldado succeeds as a stylish, dynamic thriller -- even if its amoral machismo makes for grim viewing.

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Movie Info

In Sicario: Day of the Soldado, the series begins a new chapter. In the drug war, there are no rules--and as the cartels have begun trafficking terrorists across the US border, federal agent Matt Graver (Josh Brolin) calls on the mysterious Alejandro (Benicio Del Toro), whose family was murdered by a cartel kingpin, to escalate the war in nefarious ways. Alejandro kidnaps the kingpin's daughter to inflame the conflict--but when the girl is seen as collateral damage, her fate will come between the two men as they question everything they are fighting for.

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Cast

Benicio Del Toro
as Alejandro Gillick
Josh Brolin
as Matt Graver
Isabela Moner
as Isabel Reyes
Jeffrey Donovan
as Steve Forsing
Catherine Keener
as Cynthia Foards
Matthew Modine
as James Riley
Shea Whigham
as Andy Wheeldon
Ian Bohen
as Carson Wright
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News & Interviews for Sicario: Day of the Soldado

Critic Reviews for Sicario: Day of the Soldado

All Critics (236) | Top Critics (43)

Every moment of Sicario: Day of the Soldado is soaked in an unilluminating and easy cynicism.

September 6, 2018 | Rating: 1.5/4 | Full Review…

'Day of the Soldado' would be hard to stomach at any time. It feels particularly worthless now.

July 19, 2018 | Full Review…

If there is a theme in this film, I would venture to guess that it's right there in the title. The soldier, el soldado, has his day and his way throughout.

July 10, 2018 | Full Review…

Without a humanizing element like Blunt's character, this whole grim affair is just a race to the bottom in which everyone loses.

July 1, 2018 | Rating: 2/4 | Full Review…

Moner is terrific, and her character's fortunes can be read in her eyes-blazing to begin with, as she scraps with another girl in a schoolyard, but dark and blank by the end, their youthful fire doused by the violence that she has seen.

June 29, 2018 | Full Review…

Where its predecessor, 2015's Sicario was intermittently thoughtful, this sequel is mindlessly mean-spirited.

June 29, 2018 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for Sicario: Day of the Soldado

An irregular sequel that pales in comparison to the excellent first film, especially as it betrays the motivations of the characters (which make little sense here) and becomes too implausible in the end, even if its nihilism still works thanks to the strong performances from the two leads.

Carlos Magalhães
Carlos Magalhães

Super Reviewer

½

It's not every day that we get a sequel to an award winning hard-R prestige drama. No one asked for it necessarily, but here we are. Sicario: Day of the Soldado pulls off a more-than-able effort to follow up on what made the original so insightful, dark, and eerily mesmerizing. It's not quite the well-oiled knockout Sicario was, but it is of comparable quality and adds a bit of depth to its two main leads. If you don't recall, the original Sicario was the story of a female FBI agent dragged into an escalating war between the US government and the Mexican cartels. She finds out just how morally questionable the operation is, and how the war on drugs was turning into a war on terror, with black ops and military assets liberally torturing and air-striking their way for questionable results. Sicario: Day of the Soldado goes further with this theme, even becoming more explicit. With fears of Islamic militants crossing over the border, blending in with illegal immigrants, the US government escalates the war again with the cartels, planning to play off one side against the other and then mop up what is left. This plan...goes awry, but not in the way you'd expect. The focus this time is on two of the main leads from the previous film - Benicio Del Toro's double agent and Josh Brolin's casually dressed CIA operative. And it works, for the most part. The absence of Emily Blunt can be felt at times, but the inclusion of Isabela Moner as a cartel daughter does somewhat alleviate this. And that's one the big themes here - the effect of the endless border wars on children, with generation after generation falling into the same roles and patterns. Unfortunately, Denis Villeneuve is not back helming the picture, but acclaimed screenwriter Taylor Sheridan is, giving us a crisp script with a pulse. This is a damn good sequel I can recommend to most mature adults, provided that they don't allow their biases to get in the way. And that's the problem isn't it? I have seen so many fucking think pieces written by political hacks attacking this movie. Sicario 2 doesn't bother with easy answers, as neither did its predecessor. It doesn't take a political stance, which is bold in this day and age, considering how illegal immigration is a major topic. Liberals hate it for not condemning US policy on illegal immigration and for depicting Islamic terrorism in a blunt fashion. Conservatives hate it for the nasty things it has to say about the war on drugs, how callous US special forces are to their targets, and giving sympathy to Hispanics caught in the middle. Look. I hate 2018. But I like this movie. Go see it and make up your own opinion.

Joshua Sheetz
Joshua Sheetz

Super Reviewer

Within the first 10 minutes of Hitman: Dia del Soldier, the sequel immediately sets itself politically antithetical to Sicario. The film opens with a text explaining that there are thousands of people smuggled across the U.S.-Mexico border for profit by Mexican Drug cartels. It then proceeds to show multiple jihadists blowing themselves up in Kansas City (where I was coincidentally watching the film) because, what better way to prove your Islamic extremist point than by smuggling across the border and traveling 1000 miles to blow yourself up at a Dillons? This all helps the cartels, of course, because once you hear about a terror attack, you immediately want to do a line of coke. The rest of the first act plays out like any paranoid, second grade reading level Fox News adherent's wet dream. Boogey boogey boogey! Mexicans are smuggling in terrorists so that the borders will have more security forces placed there, all just to make drug prices go up. Since ending the War on Drugs would be too simple and straight forward, Josh Brolin and Benicio del Toro carry out a series of false flag cartel hits culminating in the kidnapping of a cartel king's scrappy teenage daughter. This is all to provoke more cartel violence that will perpetuate the perpetual cycle of cartel violence. Just like the preface text, it's skipping a few logical steps on the way to "Step 3: Profit". It sounds like a good enough plan to justify production cost for the film. Cue jingoistic military porn, then rinse and repeat. They follow the action beats of the first film without any clear sense of purpose and without Roger Deakin's cinematography. The rest of the film just rambles with brief character moments from Brolin and del Toro that add nothing to the the first film and hardly make the planned third installment seem all that enticing. This is an absolutely unnecessary film. Whereas Sicario is a study of how corruption infests every echelon of our justice department yet is a necessary evil in the day to day proceedings on and around the border, this film sets these themes by the way side to focus on characters who elicited little sympathy in the first place. The trauma and disillusion we experienced with Emily Blunt's character is replaced with only the visceral spectacle of being shot by both sides. It's ineffective and ultimately pointless. I'm sure Taylor Sheridan felt the need to write this as it's his baby, but sorely lacking in these proceedings is a clear purpose or his usual righteous socio-political subtext. Sadly, giant robots couldn't have given this movie less depth.

K Nife Churchkey
K Nife Churchkey

Super Reviewer

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