The CriterionCast

The CriterionCast is not a Tomatometer-approved publication. Reviews from this publication only count toward the Tomatometer® when written by the following Tomatometer-approved critic(s): Joshua Brunsting
Rating Title/Year Author
Test Pattern (2021) Joshua Brunsting Test Pattern is an incredibly taut narrative despite a non-linear structure, with jumps in time feeling natural because Ford has complete control over their story. EDIT
Posted Mar 20, 2021
Yung Lean: In My Head (2020) Joshua Brunsting This new documentary shines a light on one of modern rap music's more influential, and controversial, figures, chronicling the rise and all of a troubled young artist. EDIT
Posted Jan 17, 2021
Somebody's Hero (2011) Joshua Brunsting Featuring a handful of great performances, it may not be the most rewarding watch ever, but I'll be damned if this one doesn't win you over by the time the credits roll. EDIT
Posted Dec 4, 2020
Proxima (2019) Joshua Brunsting It's a muted film, a mature and intimate film that doesn't lean into histrionics, instead finds beauty in the bonds of a mother and a child... EDIT
Posted Nov 13, 2020
Epicentro (2020) Joshua Brunsting A brazenly experimental feature, Epicentro is a textured and provocative look at the trail left by a history of colonialism, both literal and more figuratively. EDIT
Posted Sep 10, 2020
Martin Margiela: In His Own Words (2019) Joshua Brunsting The direct involvement of Margiela may have forced the director's hand in tone and structure, but this type of almost hagiography feels fitting of a designer with less energy. EDIT
Posted Sep 10, 2020
She Dies Tomorrow (2020) Joshua Brunsting She Dies Tomorrow is at points a film about the way one deals with mortality, collective trauma and mass psychosis, making it an essential work of 2020 pop culture. EDIT
Posted Sep 10, 2020
Shine Your Eyes (2020) Joshua Brunsting A shockingly considered and mature film... EDIT
Posted Sep 10, 2020
Rebuilding Paradise (2020) Joshua Brunsting Equal parts tender and terrifying, Rebuilding Paradise is a gorgeously rendered documentary, playing as a tense, engrossing and crisply shot study of a community torn apart. EDIT
Posted Sep 10, 2020
The Rental (2020) Joshua Brunsting This is a lean and mean slasher film, an engaging deconstruction of a time-worn genre that's been rebuilt for an aspect of everyday life that rightly deserves a good skewering EDIT
Posted Sep 10, 2020
Guest of Honour (2019) Joshua Brunsting While it may not ultimately amount to much on a thematic level, Egoyan's latest is a fascinating experiment from a director who has seemingly found the spark once again. EDIT
Posted Sep 10, 2020
Relic (2020) Joshua Brunsting Driven by a whip-smart script from James and co-writer Christian White, Relic is a rich and layered text that's both harrowing and emotionally nuanced and textured. EDIT
Posted Sep 10, 2020
Ahead of the Curve (2020) Joshua Brunsting Curve is an incredibly enjoyable and lively film (albeit simply told), the conversation within it just plays a bit too broad. More than worth one's time, despite that however. EDIT
Posted Sep 9, 2020
Shirley (2020) Joshua Brunsting Decker and DP Sturla Brandth Grovlen turn this fictional recounting of a moment in the life of Shirley Jackson into and expressionist rumination on truth, storytelling EDIT
Posted Sep 9, 2020
The Vast of Night (2019) Joshua Brunsting Very clearly an atmosphere piece, the film does have an oddly rigid narrative, owing more to things like War of the Worlds than just the radio station's WOTW call sign. EDIT
Posted Sep 9, 2020
The Trip to Greece (2020) Joshua Brunsting It's a road film, a buddy comedy and a rumination on age and mortality, all rolled into a quaint and gorgeously crafted piece of food porn that's endlessly watchable. EDIT
Posted Sep 9, 2020
Fourteen (2019) Joshua Brunsting Fourteen feels almost like a collection of journal or diary entries, devastating moments in these lives that will flash forward at the drop of a hat EDIT
Posted Sep 9, 2020
The Bad and the Beautiful (1952) Joshua Brunsting Bad proves Minnelli to be one of the most assured and powerful names in the world of cinematic melodrama, and his ability to bring to the genre the sense of tension found more often in noir pictures, really makes this film a singular and esoteric entrant. EDIT
Posted Sep 1, 2020
Tell Me Who I Am (2019) Joshua Brunsting Tell Me Who I Am is a captivating look at two brothers and the grief they live with, and in this character study is a fascinating, unflinching look at love and forgiveness in the face of abject horror. EDIT
Posted May 23, 2020
Olympic Dreams (2019) Joshua Brunsting Gorgeously shot and led by two ace performances, Olympic Dreams is the type of adult romantic comedy that simply does not get produced these days. EDIT
Posted May 12, 2020
I Was at Home, But (2019) Joshua Brunsting A tender, profoundly moving portrait of grief and family, art and motherhood, the film is a formalist achievement that feels like a movement of true growth for Schanelec EDIT
Posted May 12, 2020
The Whistlers (2019) Joshua Brunsting Porumboiu's direction is absolutely top class, with his juggling of time and space assured and often quite alluring EDIT
Posted May 12, 2020
Sorry We Missed You (2019) Joshua Brunsting Loach returns with an essential take on the gig economy that's as gorgeously made as it is humane and tender. EDIT
Posted May 12, 2020
Beautiful Something Left Behind (2020) Joshua Brunsting The film allows each subject to inform the viewer about their story in whatever way they see fit and in doing so we learn how grief is processed by the youngest of our society EDIT
Posted May 12, 2020
Sea Fever (2019) Joshua Brunsting he issue here is that everything from the characterization to the film's visual sensibility feels derivative of these references without inviting much new conversation EDIT
Posted May 12, 2020
Endings, Beginnings (2019) Joshua Brunsting It's simply a film that feels put together based on some sort of schematic of a modern romantic drama, a film that feels decidedly incomplete... EDIT
Posted May 12, 2020
Zombi Child (2019) Joshua Brunsting The latest from director Bertrand Bonello is an evocative, thought-provoking look at colonialism and identity. EDIT
Posted Jan 31, 2020
I Wish I Knew (2010) Joshua Brunsting Making its theatrical debut stateside a decade after bowing at the Cannes Film Festival, Jia Zhangke's documentary is a masterpiece worthy of (re)discovery. EDIT
Posted Jan 31, 2020
Color Out of Space (2019) Joshua Brunsting Cult director Richard Stanley's latest is a beautifully shot, if slightly bloated, cosmic horror film driven by a Nic Cage performance that stands as one of his best. EDIT
Posted Jan 31, 2020
José (2018) Joshua Brunsting Li Cheng's sophomore effort is a quiet, almost neo-realist, look into life as a young gay man in conservative Guatemala that's as beautiful as it is moving. EDIT
Posted Jan 31, 2020
The Europeans (1979) Joshua Brunsting The first of three Henry James adaptations produced by the Merchant Ivory team, this is an entrancing entry not just in their partnership but in the career of Ivory himself. EDIT
Posted Jan 8, 2020
The Cave (2019) Joshua Brunsting A thrilling, ceaselessly captivating documentary... EDIT
Posted Dec 3, 2019
Synonymes (2018) Joshua Brunsting A captivating look at the intersection between nationalism and toxic masculinity, few films feel as vital and truly important in 2019 as this superlative piece of work. EDIT
Posted Dec 1, 2019
Gay Chorus Deep South (2019) Joshua Brunsting Gorgeously shot, Gay Chorus Deep South is a handsomely rendered, if maybe a bit thin, look at a group of people trying to bring about change through music. EDIT
Posted Dec 1, 2019
A Fish in the Bathtub (1999) Joshua Brunsting Joan Micklin Silver's underrated and rarely seen comedic gem is a gorgeously shot, emotionally rich romantic comedy with a collection of ace performances and an ace script EDIT
Posted Dec 1, 2019
Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project (2019) Joshua Brunsting What makes Recorder so utterly compelling and beautifully textured is the absolute compassion and sympathy that director Matt Wolf has for his subject EDIT
Posted Dec 1, 2019
Feast of the Epiphany (2018) Joshua Brunsting The premiere film from Reverse Shot, this docu-fiction hybrid is a quiet, moving portrait of life, loss and food. EDIT
Posted Dec 1, 2019
First Love (2019) Joshua Brunsting Miike's direction is visceral, finding the filmmaker not only completely invested in this narrative but also willing to break from his formula at a drop of the hat. EDIT
Posted Oct 15, 2019
Parasite (2019) Joshua Brunsting Bong takes this battle between classes and one family's attempt to take that much craved next step up the economic ladder, and twists it into a fun house thrill ride. EDIT
Posted Oct 15, 2019
I Love You, I Don't (1976) Joshua Brunsting Gainsbourg may not have the skill to nail a finale that's almost too violent, but thanks to a new restoration, Je T'aime Moi Non Plus is an absolute revelation. EDIT
Posted Oct 15, 2019
Dilili in Paris (2018) Joshua Brunsting Feminist and anti-racist to the bone, Ocelot's latest film is a startling, if misshapen, gem that will hopefully find an audience despite a modest release schedule. EDIT
Posted Oct 15, 2019
Loro (2018) Joshua Brunsting Servillo's Berlusconi is nuanced in a way that nothing else in the film is. Lacking the satirical bite of a Wolf Of Wall Street, Loro is a lushly composed, toothless satire. EDIT
Posted Oct 15, 2019
The Wedding Year (2019) Joshua Brunsting It's rare, in 2019, to have a genuinely good time at the movies and this, in all of its simplicity and cliche, is absolutely that. EDIT
Posted Oct 15, 2019
Diego Maradona (2019) Joshua Brunsting With a scholarly eye towards research, Maradona is a richly textured, nuanced portrait not only of a titanic figure in sports, but the rise of a sportsman into a god. EDIT
Posted Oct 15, 2019
Monos (2019) Joshua Brunsting A visceral rumination on devolving social norms in the face of war, Monos is not only the return of a great filmmaker, but one of the great political allegories of 2019. EDIT
Posted Oct 15, 2019
I'm Leaving Now (2018) Joshua Brunsting Viewers may not learn a lot about this man or his life specifically, but through a profound sense of intimacy they may find something even greater under this film's proverbial hood - empathy. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
Moonlight Sonata: Deafness in Three Movements (2019) Joshua Brunsting Moonlight Sonata becomes a tender and evocative document of a very specific human experience that's palpable for anyone forced to deal with a set back in life. EDIT
Posted Sep 26, 2019
American Factory (2019) Joshua Brunsting Documenting this in as frank a manner as Riechert and Bognar do is incredibly wise, avoiding the easy, disposable type of agitprop that has made a home on streaming in 2019. EDIT
Posted Sep 11, 2019
Friedkin Uncut (2018) Joshua Brunsting At best, Friedkin Uncut is a serviceable EPK on whatever Friedkin film is set to get yet another Blu-ray release. Flat, lifeless, superficial. Just a slog. EDIT
Posted Sep 11, 2019
End of the Century (2019) Joshua Brunsting Closing on a note that's almost meta-physical in its sense of wish-fulfillment, End Of The Century is a profoundly moving, intensely quiet romance drama EDIT
Posted Sep 11, 2019