The Queen Reviews

  • Aug 24, 2020

    Decent watch, but it's Helen Mirren's performance that stands out as possibly her best.

    Decent watch, but it's Helen Mirren's performance that stands out as possibly her best.

  • Aug 15, 2020

    Realistic, emotional, extremely thought provoking ,full of pathos,& beautifully acted.... It made me value & respect the Queen & see things from her point of view,what a tough life she has had, borne with dedication & dignity, a very special lady indeed...

    Realistic, emotional, extremely thought provoking ,full of pathos,& beautifully acted.... It made me value & respect the Queen & see things from her point of view,what a tough life she has had, borne with dedication & dignity, a very special lady indeed...

  • Jul 27, 2020

    This drama was pretty good. Helen Mirren, Michael Sheen, James Cromwell, and the rest of the cast did a pretty good job in this movie. This true story about the death of Princess Diana and how the royal family should handle it was pretty dramatic and tragic. This was a time of mourning for the whole country and the royal family didn't want it to be a public affair, so they decided handle it by protocol, but the public found that insulting. In the end, Queen Elizabeth did the right thing not just for the people but for Diana. If you haven't seen this movie yet, you'll probably enjoy it. That's my opinion.

    This drama was pretty good. Helen Mirren, Michael Sheen, James Cromwell, and the rest of the cast did a pretty good job in this movie. This true story about the death of Princess Diana and how the royal family should handle it was pretty dramatic and tragic. This was a time of mourning for the whole country and the royal family didn't want it to be a public affair, so they decided handle it by protocol, but the public found that insulting. In the end, Queen Elizabeth did the right thing not just for the people but for Diana. If you haven't seen this movie yet, you'll probably enjoy it. That's my opinion.

  • Jul 22, 2020

    this movie is so fucking boring and kind of confusing. England is stupid.

    this movie is so fucking boring and kind of confusing. England is stupid.

  • Jul 06, 2020

    Wonderful film. I felt moved at times.

    Wonderful film. I felt moved at times.

  • Jun 26, 2020

    I could care less about any of the historical figures, and it still held my attention due to some great performances.

    I could care less about any of the historical figures, and it still held my attention due to some great performances.

  • Jun 22, 2020

    Very good story about the Queen and the Royal family in the aftermath of Diana's death. Helen Mirren is excellent as she conveys Queen Elizabeth's attempt to balance traditional protocol with public sentiment.

    Very good story about the Queen and the Royal family in the aftermath of Diana's death. Helen Mirren is excellent as she conveys Queen Elizabeth's attempt to balance traditional protocol with public sentiment.

  • Jun 18, 2020

    Wonderful movie with wonderful performances.

    Wonderful movie with wonderful performances.

  • May 16, 2020

    With Helen Mirren as the queen, and Michael Sheen as the prime minister they carry this movie in the time surrounding Princess Diana's tragic accident. It shows not just how it affected England but the Royal Family itself. Helen, as we know, has played the queen many times and feels comfortable in this high profile role. It's not an easy part to pull off. The acting is so real, you almost feels like you got a true perspective of what goes on in the royal household, as dysfunctional as it may be.

    With Helen Mirren as the queen, and Michael Sheen as the prime minister they carry this movie in the time surrounding Princess Diana's tragic accident. It shows not just how it affected England but the Royal Family itself. Helen, as we know, has played the queen many times and feels comfortable in this high profile role. It's not an easy part to pull off. The acting is so real, you almost feels like you got a true perspective of what goes on in the royal household, as dysfunctional as it may be.

  • Jun 21, 2019

    I knew I was going to find the experience of watching this film difficult because almost everything it stands for goes against what I believe. My familiarity with director Stephen Frears comes mostly from the terrible Judi Dench vehicles he has directed, Mrs. Henderson Presents (2005) and Victoria & Abdul (2017), but he also made High Fidelity (2000) which gave me hope. I found the film to be less offensive than I thought it would be but it felt more like a BBC television production than a feature film which led me to be confused by the amount of Academy Award nominations it received. If you love Helen Mirren then this will probably be one of your favorite films but personally I believe she does much better work in The Madness of King George (1994) and Cal (1984). After the death of Princess Diana, Queen Elizabeth II, Helen Mirren, faces increasing pressure from the public to open up emotionally and allow commoners to share in the Royal Family's grief for ‘The people's princess." She is aided in this transition by popular new prime minister Tony Blair, Michael Sheen, who is accepted by the public due to the speeches he makes in which he praises Diana. In the end the film turns into propaganda of sorts for why the monarchy is important and should remain as an institution. The only character that I could really latch onto in the film was Cherie Blair, Helen McCrory, who sees the system for how ridiculous it is and openly mocks the Queen in how arrogant and out of touch she is. I did not feel one ounce of sympathy for the woman who has been given everything and yet complains about having given her entire life to the people. Blair's transformation from being a skeptic of sorts to a full on acolyte of the Queen also seemed unrealistic as he is ambivalent one minute and then railing against those who dare to decry her the next. This is not a film that aims to show complexity as it becomes very clear what it's goal is when we see the Queen moaning about her devotion to the commoners and then cut to a shot of onlookers staring adoringly at her. The climactic moment of the film occurs when the Queen heads out of Buckingham Palace and interacts with the commoners, an "unprecedented" move as the news coverage voiceover informs us. This moment does not humble her or serve to show that she has changed in any way. No, we see her getting bowed to by people who have presumably worked to stay financially afloat and who hold on to silly customs because they have been told to by society. Nothing changes and that leaves the film feeling flat as we have learnt nothing that we could not have found out from one of the adoring articles written in the cheap tabloids. For a supposed prestige drama this film has very little weight to it and while I can see it going down well with my more traditional grandparents I was actually rather disgusted. The performances in the film were solid but unremarkable as there was never a moment when I felt that the actors weren't just doing great impressions of the important real life figures they were playing. Mirren even won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her role as the Queen but I think that Judi Dench was doing something truly incredible in Notes on a Scandal (2006). Sheen gives a fine performance as a besieged Tony Blair, a role he plays often, but the poor writing of his character lets him down and his big moments all feel a bit contrived. In other words, this was not one of the best films of 2006. One positive thing I could say about this film is that it is better than Diana (2013) which covers the same historical figure with a very different tone. I have never understood all of the hoopla about "The people's princess" myself so perhaps that was another thing I brought into the film that prevented me from liking it but I don't think it's just my real dislike of the characters that makes this one a film to miss.

    I knew I was going to find the experience of watching this film difficult because almost everything it stands for goes against what I believe. My familiarity with director Stephen Frears comes mostly from the terrible Judi Dench vehicles he has directed, Mrs. Henderson Presents (2005) and Victoria & Abdul (2017), but he also made High Fidelity (2000) which gave me hope. I found the film to be less offensive than I thought it would be but it felt more like a BBC television production than a feature film which led me to be confused by the amount of Academy Award nominations it received. If you love Helen Mirren then this will probably be one of your favorite films but personally I believe she does much better work in The Madness of King George (1994) and Cal (1984). After the death of Princess Diana, Queen Elizabeth II, Helen Mirren, faces increasing pressure from the public to open up emotionally and allow commoners to share in the Royal Family's grief for ‘The people's princess." She is aided in this transition by popular new prime minister Tony Blair, Michael Sheen, who is accepted by the public due to the speeches he makes in which he praises Diana. In the end the film turns into propaganda of sorts for why the monarchy is important and should remain as an institution. The only character that I could really latch onto in the film was Cherie Blair, Helen McCrory, who sees the system for how ridiculous it is and openly mocks the Queen in how arrogant and out of touch she is. I did not feel one ounce of sympathy for the woman who has been given everything and yet complains about having given her entire life to the people. Blair's transformation from being a skeptic of sorts to a full on acolyte of the Queen also seemed unrealistic as he is ambivalent one minute and then railing against those who dare to decry her the next. This is not a film that aims to show complexity as it becomes very clear what it's goal is when we see the Queen moaning about her devotion to the commoners and then cut to a shot of onlookers staring adoringly at her. The climactic moment of the film occurs when the Queen heads out of Buckingham Palace and interacts with the commoners, an "unprecedented" move as the news coverage voiceover informs us. This moment does not humble her or serve to show that she has changed in any way. No, we see her getting bowed to by people who have presumably worked to stay financially afloat and who hold on to silly customs because they have been told to by society. Nothing changes and that leaves the film feeling flat as we have learnt nothing that we could not have found out from one of the adoring articles written in the cheap tabloids. For a supposed prestige drama this film has very little weight to it and while I can see it going down well with my more traditional grandparents I was actually rather disgusted. The performances in the film were solid but unremarkable as there was never a moment when I felt that the actors weren't just doing great impressions of the important real life figures they were playing. Mirren even won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her role as the Queen but I think that Judi Dench was doing something truly incredible in Notes on a Scandal (2006). Sheen gives a fine performance as a besieged Tony Blair, a role he plays often, but the poor writing of his character lets him down and his big moments all feel a bit contrived. In other words, this was not one of the best films of 2006. One positive thing I could say about this film is that it is better than Diana (2013) which covers the same historical figure with a very different tone. I have never understood all of the hoopla about "The people's princess" myself so perhaps that was another thing I brought into the film that prevented me from liking it but I don't think it's just my real dislike of the characters that makes this one a film to miss.