Goethe-Institute Australien Magazine

Goethe-Institute Australien Magazine is not a Tomatometer-approved publication. Reviews from this publication only count toward the Tomatometer when written by the following Tomatometer-approved critic(s): Sarah Ward
Rating Title/Year Author
Blue Velvet Revisited (2016) Sarah Ward While it threatens to stretch the boundaries of its structure and style with its pacing at points, Blue Velvet Revisited also proves revelatory, specifically where Lynch and his creative process is concerned. EDIT
Posted Jan 27, 2019
Pope Francis -- A Man of His Word (2018) Sarah Ward Only ever remains skin deep; the filmic equivalent of reading from the prayer book and listening to the sermon, rather than interrogating and internalising the words contained within. EDIT
Posted Sep 24, 2018
Submergence (2017) Sarah Ward Handsomely shot and involvingly performed, yet it sometimes functions like its striking but overused graphic matches, diving too deep into obviousness. EDIT
Posted Sep 24, 2018
The Field Guide to Evil (2018) Sarah Ward Bewitches through mood, theme and style sometimes more than story, though the fact that some shorts stand out more than others is emblematic of the format above all else. EDIT
Posted Aug 21, 2018
Central Airport THF (2018) Sarah Ward Always sees its location and subjects for the complex place and people they are, and not the external labels ascribed to them. EDIT
Posted Aug 21, 2018
Den' Pobedy (2018) Sarah Ward Peers at a place brimming with history and watches the people who walk across the site, turning their reactions into an observational portrait of humanity processing the past. EDIT
Posted Jul 31, 2018
Hagazussa: A Heathen's Curse (2017) Sarah Ward A gripping manifestation of deep-seeded unease infecting and shaping a woman's life. EDIT
Posted Jul 29, 2018
The Cleaners (2018) Sarah Ward A documentary enlivened by its subject matter more than its noir-like approach. EDIT
Posted Jul 16, 2018
The Marriage of Maria Braun (1978) Sarah Ward A feature of desire and futility, of resourcefulness and inevitability, and of honestly assessing a plethora of contradictions on a human and societal level. EDIT
Posted Jun 21, 2018
In the Aisles (2018) Sarah Ward Finds beauty and stylish choreography as workers go about their regular tasks, affection and understanding as they share glances across the shelves, and camaraderie as they weather ups and downs both inside and outside the store. EDIT
Posted Jun 12, 2018
3 Days in Quiberon (2018) Sarah Ward Convincingly takes the viewer beyond the surface of Schneider's stardom and her final attempt to control it. EDIT
Posted Jun 12, 2018
Wings of Desire (1987) Sarah Ward Whether or not Wings of Desire qualifies as the most poetic feature to grace the silver screen, it certainly earns that honour where Berlin is concerned. EDIT
Posted Jun 12, 2018
The Silent Revolution (2018) Sarah Ward While the movie throws up few surprises, even as it exposes a particular event that's hardly well-known, it still has the requisite impact. EDIT
Posted Jun 12, 2018
The Song Keepers (2017) Sarah Ward As astonishing as the underlying situation remains, and as vibrant as the melodies are to hear, it's the stories behind the choir that resound even after the choir stops. EDIT
Posted May 3, 2018
Human Flow (2017) Sarah Ward Not only does Human Flow succeed in its awareness-raising quest, but it also becomes exactly what Ai is best known for: a visually striking piece of art that contemplates a vital subject. EDIT
Posted Mar 19, 2018
The Green Fog (2017) Sarah Ward A mélange of the familiar and unknown that oozes affection and artistry, the end result sweeps over cinema-loving viewers like the inescapable titular mist. EDIT
Posted Mar 19, 2018
Transit (2018) Sarah Ward Patient, probing, and poetic in both its affairs of the heart and its worries of the soul: as always, a film by Christian Petzold is a film of intricately layered artistry. EDIT
Posted Mar 19, 2018
Gurrumul (2017) Sarah Ward Involving, affectionate and singing with emotion. EDIT
Posted Mar 19, 2018
Black '47 (2018) Sarah Ward Solemn in its tenor but impassioned in its heart, it's more effective, rousing and involving than its blend of real-life hardship and hearty genre might sound. EDIT
Posted Mar 19, 2018
7 Days in Entebbe (2018) Sarah Ward Like the passengers held hostage in Uganda in the feature's true tale, 7 Days in Entebbe is stuck in limbo. EDIT
Posted Mar 19, 2018
Damsel (2018) Sarah Ward A delight that doesn't always get it right, but never needs saving. EDIT
Posted Mar 19, 2018
The Seen and Unseen (2017) Sarah Ward Told with poetic images to match its resonant narrative. EDIT
Posted Mar 19, 2018
The Cloverfield Paradox (2018) Sarah Ward Never manages to capitalise upon its impressive cast, or offer much more than a mildly diverting imitation of its genre predecessors. EDIT
Posted Mar 19, 2018
Downsizing (2017) Sarah Ward As the feature endeavours to shrink humanity down to size, while demonstrating that urges, emotions and actions don't dwindle with them, its grasp exceeds its reach. EDIT
Posted Dec 14, 2017
Tulip Fever (2017) Sarah Ward Looks the blossoming part with its elegant, painterly staging, but never finds an appropriate tone for the tale's sex, envy and tulip-bartering theatrics. EDIT
Posted Dec 14, 2017
Bye Bye Germany (2017) Sarah Ward Grappling with the hurtful past while finding pleasures in the present always remains a bittersweet affair. EDIT
Posted Dec 14, 2017
The Exception (2016) Sarah Ward When the feature's various aspects do shine - the individual performances, and the thoughtful way that each of the three main characters are forced to confront their place in the conflict, for example - it remains involving. EDIT
Posted Nov 21, 2017
The Cakemaker (2017) Sarah Ward Obvious in its narrative path but delicate and compassionate in its treatment of the expected, a measured and moving film results. EDIT
Posted Nov 7, 2017
Bunch of Kunst (2017) Sarah Ward A probing, potent and propulsive celebration for the already acquainted and a lure for the uninitiated. EDIT
Posted Sep 17, 2017
Traceable (2014) Sarah Ward An eye-opening film... and one that also acts as a work of advocacy for a different relationship between fast fashion consumption and its production. EDIT
Posted Sep 11, 2017
The Square (2017) Sarah Ward An acerbic, entertaining, surreal and statement-making portrait. EDIT
Posted Aug 29, 2017
Manifesto (2015) Sarah Ward Assaults the audience with both concepts and their conceptualisation. EDIT
Posted Aug 29, 2017
The Dreamed Path (2016) Sarah Ward As lyrical as it is detail-oriented, and as oneiric and it is steeped in relatable instances. EDIT
Posted Aug 29, 2017
Western (2017) Sarah Ward A feature by any other moniker would've proved as quietly powerful, but this one more than earns its genre and title. EDIT
Posted Aug 29, 2017
Salt and Fire (2016) Sarah Ward Suffers from stilted dialogue, tangential conversations that lead both everywhere and nowhere, plot threads and characters left hanging, and committed but constrained performances. EDIT
Posted Aug 29, 2017
A Conspiracy of Faith (2016) Sarah Ward Bleak in its kidnapping contents but bright in its images. EDIT
Posted Aug 22, 2017
The Untamed (2016) Sarah Ward Nothing about it agrees to fit neatly within established boundaries. EDIT
Posted Jul 20, 2017
Aus dem Nichts (2017) Sarah Ward [Diane Kruger] turns in one of the finest performances of her career. EDIT
Posted Jul 20, 2017
Risk (2016) Sarah Ward An intriguing risk reaching for but never quite grasping the rewards it seeks, just like everything it captures EDIT
Posted Jul 20, 2017
Happy End (2017) Sarah Ward It's easy to feel as though Haneke is retracing his own footsteps, and he is, but he's doing so with purpose and self-awareness. EDIT
Posted Jul 20, 2017
Austerlitz (2016) Sarah Ward To watch his film is to simply watch people walk in the footsteps of atrocity and wear their natural, instantaneous unguarded responses. EDIT
Posted Jul 20, 2017
Axolotl Overkill (2017) Sarah Ward Striking in its candour... it takes confidence to bring such a self-assured package together. EDIT
Posted Jul 20, 2017
Lore (2012) Sarah Ward The portrait that emerges proves, above all else, one of resilience and adaptability. EDIT
Posted Jul 20, 2017
The Young Karl Marx (2017) Sarah Ward Another of Peck's meaty, weighty and stirring showcases of talk, language, theories and concepts designed to express opposition, mobilise change and make a difference. EDIT
Posted Jul 20, 2017
I Am Not Your Negro (2016) Sarah Ward The angriest, most important lesson audiences will ever hear. EDIT
Posted Jul 20, 2017
Casting JonBenét (2017) Sarah Ward The factual combines with the first steps towards fictionalisation to create something new, and something arguably all the more powerful than a feature about JonBenet Ramsay made in either mode. EDIT
Posted Jul 20, 2017
Call Me by Your Name (2017) Sarah Ward Viewers don't just witness a 17-year-old boy become infatuated, nor understand it; they feel as though they're in the exact same situation themselves. EDIT
Posted Jul 20, 2017
Return to Montauk (2017) Sarah Ward Road to Montauk is warm, soulful but overly familiar; however the universal urge to consider how the past shapes the future anchors this softly filmed account of middle-aged yearning with much-needed sincerity. EDIT
Posted Jul 20, 2017
The Bar (2016) Sarah Ward The part black comedy, part tense thriller observes human interaction at its most primal and survival-oriented. EDIT
Posted Jul 20, 2017
Barrage (2017) Sarah Ward [Here] a glint in the eye can say so much, both about who a person is, and who they want to be. EDIT
Posted Jul 20, 2017