Screen Queens

Screen Queens is not a Tomatometer-approved publication. Reviews from this publication only count toward the Tomatometer when written by the following Tomatometer-approved critic(s): Amelia Harvey, Caroline Madden, Chloe Leeson, Emily Maskell, Hannah Ryan, Millicent Thomas, Rebecca Harrison, Sara Clements
Rating Title/Year Author
() Chloe Leeson Coming in at just over 90 minutes, it's a surprise that Tales from the Lodge feels so crawlingly long for a film split down into multiple bite-size sections. EDIT
Posted Oct 16, 2019
Judy (2019) Rebecca Harrison On the glittering surface of things, Judy is critical of her abusers - yet I left the theatre feeling more dejected than a witch caught with no umbrella in the rain. EDIT
Posted Oct 10, 2019
Lara (2019) Rahul Patel The screenplay is sharp and seasoned with wit in this intimate portrait of a jealous, well-dressed mother. Harfouch displays excellent skill in bringing this character to life, especially in her well-timed, sassy responses... EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
Joker (2019) Millicent Thomas Joker isn't a work of genius, it's not radical, bold, nor right-wing propaganda. It's just a movie, and a bad one. EDIT
Posted Oct 9, 2019
Beach Rats (2017) Emily Maskell [Eliza] Hittman has created a poignant film about the yearning frustrations of identity that is well worth a watch. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2019
Battle (2018) Emily Maskell The film moves to a rhythm that has been heard before, but Battle still offers an enjoyable insight into a heartfelt story. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2019
Burn Burn Burn (2015) Emily Maskell While Burn, Burn, Burn may not be a perfect road-trip movie, it does achieve a dry humour that is well executed with its lead women. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2019
Dreams of a Life (2011) Emily Maskell Dreams of a Life is a poignant reflection on the value of relationships and the necessity of connection. [Carol] Morley presents a reminder that the smallest act of re-connection may turn out to have a much bigger effect. EDIT
Posted Oct 7, 2019
Low Tide (2019) Chloe Leeson Low Tide knows where it came from but adequately avoids succumbing to nostalgia. Instead, Kevin McMullin paints a darker portrait of the forgotten youth of the Jersey Shore that is as violent as it is strangely charming... EDIT
Posted Oct 4, 2019
Harpoon (2019) Chloe Leeson It gets gross, and it gets weird. While its gore can be stomach-churning in pretty much every instance it is on display, the dark humour remains the most brilliantly sick part EDIT
Posted Oct 3, 2019
4/5 Memory: The Origins of Alien (2019) Amelia Harvey Even if you're not a fan of Alien, this is an interesting look at the creative process and an investigation into how various types of story line inspired this iconic film. EDIT
Posted Oct 3, 2019
Mapplethorpe (2018) Millicent Thomas Sadly, it feels like a passive slide-show of a Wikipedia entry, albeit a beautiful one. EDIT
Posted Oct 2, 2019
After Midnight (2019) Chloe Leeson This isn't so much a film about a doomed relationship, its about holding yourself accountable and saving yourself first. EDIT
Posted Oct 2, 2019
3/5 Queering the Script (2019) Amelia Harvey Queering the Script ultimately bites off a little more than it can chew. The flow is disorientating, jumping between shows, themes and eras. Just when one theme gets interesting it's interrupted with a completely different one. EDIT
Posted Sep 27, 2019
Yes, God, Yes (2017) Caroline Madden Yes, God, Yes is one of those films that shines because of the author's particular autobiographical influence. EDIT
Posted Sep 26, 2019
Hell House LLC III: Lake of Fire (2019) Chloe Leeson Hell House LLC is far from a terrible offering. When its good, its skin-crawlingly terrifying, but when its bad its like a student film with a Marvel mindset of 'world expansion'. EDIT
Posted Sep 26, 2019
3/5 Emma Peeters (2018) Amelia Harvey Emma Peeters is ultimately a little too sugary and never deviates far away from the expected framework of a romantic comedy, even if the subject is a little darker than the norm. EDIT
Posted Sep 26, 2019
Riot Girls (2019) Chloe Leeson Vuckovic revels in displays of punk, anarchy and androgyny through a fun sci-fi splatter story that exacerbates the already extreme mindsets of teenagers where every small decision is life or death... EDIT
Posted Sep 17, 2019
Kamera o tomeru na! (2017) Chloe Leeson One Cut of the Dead doesn't even have to attempt anything new with traditional zombie lore, but the ingenious way its story is told is a revitalisation worthy of praise. EDIT
Posted Sep 16, 2019
3/5 Life Support (2019) Amelia Harvey There are many things that Clarke's debut does well but never as well as someone else before him. 3 Days with Dad concentrates too hard on the concept that death is the Great Reckoning, and not enough time building up characters. EDIT
Posted Sep 16, 2019
It: Chapter Two (2019) Millicent Thomas Every cast member here is in full-throttle, and the whole package feels made with a bursting heart and great love for the Losers of Derry. EDIT
Posted Sep 12, 2019
Outside In (2017) Emily Maskell [Lynn] Shelton's film may have a very intentional focus upon just character but this does contribute to Outside In's measured narrative. A film that captures the raw conflict of life with great honesty. EDIT
Posted Sep 3, 2019
Madness in the Method (2019) Chloe Leeson It seems that in this sense, perhaps Mewes would have been better off in making his debut about someone other than himself... EDIT
Posted Aug 29, 2019
() Chloe Leeson With its staggeringly beautiful cinematography of down-and-dirty New York and a layered central performance, Adam Wonder's debut feature is a complex and dynamic look at social outliers and how we find the means to survive. EDIT
Posted Aug 26, 2019
Luz (2018) Chloe Leeson Impressive in both its visuals and sound design that echoes off the highest points of 70s Giallo, Luz still manages to feel entirely unique. EDIT
Posted Aug 16, 2019
Pink Wall (2019) Caroline Madden The pair have scintillating chemistry, and this is made apparent in their easygoing improvisational dialogue. EDIT
Posted Aug 8, 2019
Freaks (2018) Chloe Leeson Lipovsky and Stein infuse their sci-fi with a well-meaning socially conscious message that suffers from its need to appeal to current audiences, but nonetheless delivers a thrilling mystery to satisfy an appetite for something a little surprising. EDIT
Posted Aug 5, 2019
Homewrecker (2019) Chloe Leeson Homewrecker is so confident in letting its two leads run wild that its difficult to not be dragged into the cat-fight. EDIT
Posted Aug 5, 2019
Charlie Says (2018) Chloe Leeson The cultural weight of the Manson Family Murders...will always be a tough, almost unexplainable mindset to recreate and explain from both the women and Manson himself, but Harron is adept at turning the tables to present a fresh and feminist perspective. EDIT
Posted Jul 25, 2019
Satanic Panic (2019) Sara Clements While it's wonderful to see a message like this conveyed in such a genre, Stardust's film takes a little too long to establish what it's trying to say. And as a result, the impact wanes. EDIT
Posted Jul 25, 2019
Deadcon (2019) Chloe Leeson A yawn-inducing script throws in tired tropes to mix with a topic chosen solely to feel culturally relevant; a social-media misfire that isn't worth subscribing to. EDIT
Posted Jul 19, 2019
The Last to See Them (2019) Chloe Leeson Sadly, the dreary pacifist approach on display in The Last to See Them very quickly feels like a non-event in its familiar home-invasion set-up. EDIT
Posted Jul 19, 2019
Trespassers (2018) Chloe Leeson Trespassers is a tightly-knit home invasion thriller that doesn't stray too far from the well-trodden path, but plants enough moments to shock and surprise. EDIT
Posted Jul 19, 2019
Sadako (2019) Chloe Leeson Sadako is a tired regurgitation of the glory days of J-horror that relies too much on its audience's nostalgia to coast by. EDIT
Posted Jul 19, 2019
Arctic (2018) Chloe Leeson By taking the naturalistic approach, Penna manages to do what most first-time directors cannot: show restraint. EDIT
Posted Jul 19, 2019
The Art of Self-Defense (2019) Chloe Leeson Stearn handles the subject with just enough tongue-in-cheek bleak humour to quiz even the most sceptical of minds. EDIT
Posted Jul 19, 2019
3/5 Jellyfish (2018) Millicent Thomas Jellyfish offers little catharsis in its climax; just fizzling out means that the film is easily forgettable, but Liv Hill won't be. EDIT
Posted Jun 27, 2019
3.5/5 Child's Play (2019) Millicent Thomas Child's Play is an Entertaining Technological Bloodbath EDIT
Posted Jun 27, 2019
5/5 Support the Girls (2018) Millicent Thomas Support The Girls is a wholesome and nuanced celebration of sisterhood and just getting through the day. EDIT
Posted Jun 27, 2019
4/5 Ophelia (2018) Millicent Thomas Ophelia Weaves a Visceral Tale, but Fails to Reach its Dramatic Heights EDIT
Posted Jun 27, 2019
3.5/5 Villains (2019) Millicent Thomas Villains is an absurdly fun ride with memorable performances and some knockout comic timing - just don't think about it too much after. EDIT
Posted Jun 16, 2019
() Caroline Madden #Like is a searing rallying cry against the manipulation, abuse, and objectification that women face on a daily basis. EDIT
Posted Jun 14, 2019
Boar (2017) Chloe Leeson Boar is nothing more and nothing less than what it says on the tin: a gruesome creature feature that's as Australian as it gets. EDIT
Posted Jun 13, 2019
Knives and Skin (2019) Chloe Leeson The film's approach to narrative structure is both messy and strangely confident and alluring, poising Knives and Skin as a bold and complicated cross-genre anomaly, much like the women Reeder lovingly depicts. EDIT
Posted Jun 13, 2019
1/5 The Nightingale (2018) Millicent Thomas If you upset your audience to the point where they struggle to stay in their seats, how are you going to educate them? EDIT
Posted Jun 5, 2019
4/5 Dark Phoenix (2019) Millicent Thomas Many fans have had their faith shaken in recent years, but DARK PHOENIX is a loving, if imperfect, farewell to nearly 20 years of Charles and the X-Men. EDIT
Posted Jun 5, 2019
The Perfection (2018) Chloe Leeson The Perfection works well as something to laugh about with your mates on a Friday night. EDIT
Posted May 29, 2019
5/5 Booksmart (2019) Millicent Thomas Booksmart will be remembered as one of the great high school comedies. EDIT
Posted May 25, 2019
4/5 Aladdin (2019) Millicent Thomas Does it possess the same magic as the original animation? Short answer: yes - in buckets. EDIT
Posted May 22, 2019
House of Sweat and Tears (2018) Chloe Leeson House of Sweat and Tears deftly conjures its disturbing imagery but never escalates to propel its story, or characters, further. EDIT
Posted May 17, 2019