New York Magazine/Vulture

Tomatometer-approved publication
Rating Title/Year Author
The Photograph (2020) Angelica Jade Bastién The Photograph is a sincerely beguiling film, even for its faults. EDIT
Posted Feb 14, 2020
Fantasy Island (2020) Alison Willmore Just wretchedly unenjoyable. EDIT
Posted Feb 14, 2020
To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You (2020) Alison Willmore It actually ends up unintentionally undercutting the relationship the film asks us to be invested in. EDIT
Posted Feb 13, 2020
Sonic the Hedgehog (2020) Bilge Ebiri Carrey is the film's most prized weapon, letting us wallow in the ridiculousness of this whole enterprise without ever holding himself above it. EDIT
Posted Feb 12, 2020
Portrait of a Lady on Fire (2019) Bilge Ebiri Sciamma has a great feel for structure, for emotional arcs, and for pinpoint-accurate catharses that nevertheless preserve the tantalizing enigma of her characters. EDIT
Posted Feb 12, 2020
() Pete Beatty James brilliantly investigates the seams of identity, race, and community strained by Iverson's trial, conviction, and subsequent pardon, with an added charge from his own ties to home. EDIT
Posted Feb 10, 2020
Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) (2020) Alison Willmore The movie never feels entirely decided as to what that is. EDIT
Posted Feb 5, 2020
Promising Young Woman (2020) Alison Willmore Fennell's film is a vibrant, stylistically precise piece of work, but the sentiments it conveys don't feel examined. It's an acceleration off a cliff when what you'd really like to see is some kind of road forward, no matter how rough. EDIT
Posted Jan 28, 2020
Kajillionaire (2020) Bilge Ebiri Most directors not named David Lynch wouldn't be able to handle just one of these aforementioned surreal elements - they'd either overplay it, or underplay it - but July effectively immerses us in this defiantly unpredictable world. EDIT
Posted Jan 27, 2020
Downhill (2020) Bilge Ebiri It can't quite match the power of Östlund's film, or its bemused, clinical (dare I say Scandinavian?) sensibility, but it has an awkward, American charm all its own. EDIT
Posted Jan 27, 2020
Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020) Alison Willmore Never Rarely Sometimes Always isn't agitprop for an era of increasingly restricted abortion access, though it'd be entirely justified and effective in being so. EDIT
Posted Jan 26, 2020
The Assistant (2019) Alison Willmore What makes the film such a spare but searingly insightful treatment of the issues at the core of Me Too is the way it refuses to separate its unseen executive's sexual predation from the larger structures that enable it. EDIT
Posted Jan 26, 2020
Into the Deep (2020) Bilge Ebiri The kind of film that, through the dark fortune of timing, starts off as one thing and then proceeds to become something far more important and disturbing, effectively interrogating itself. EDIT
Posted Jan 25, 2020
The Gentlemen (2020) Alison Willmore A movie that's clearly meant to be seen as a return to laddish form but that instead feels sour and begrudging - the work of someone who's got nothing left to contribute to the game but can't bring himself to leave it behind. EDIT
Posted Jan 23, 2020
Weathering With You (2019) Alison Willmore Weathering With You comes across as YA in the best possible sense, in that the film's audience never has to stretch too far to get back to the feeling of being the age of its characters. EDIT
Posted Jan 16, 2020
Richard's Things (1980) David Denby A patch of dreariness. EDIT
Posted Jan 15, 2020
Dolittle (2020) Bilge Ebiri I wasn't expecting Dolittle to be good, exactly, but I wasn't expecting it to be quite this bad. EDIT
Posted Jan 15, 2020
Bad Boys for Life (2020) Bilge Ebiri Overall, Bad Boys for Life is probably a wash, but it ends so well that I now find myself not entirely opposed to the idea of a fourth Bad Boys entry. Whatcha gonna do? EDIT
Posted Jan 15, 2020
Leslie Jones: Time Machine (2020) Kathryn VanArendonk As much as anything else in Time Machine, the missing eyelashes communicate how big and ebullient Jones's performance is. She has the ability to make a careful performance feel wildly combustible. EDIT
Posted Jan 14, 2020
I Lost My Body (2019) Bilge Ebiri A gloriously hand-animated existential fable that manages to be both genuinely sweet and thoroughly twisted. EDIT
Posted Jan 14, 2020
Like a Boss (2020) Alison Willmore How do you make a movie with Tiffany Haddish, Rose Byrne, Jennifer Coolidge, and Billy Porter, not to mention Salma Hayek in full human-cartoon form, and have it be so devoid of joy? EDIT
Posted Jan 11, 2020
Underwater (2020) Bilge Ebiri Underwater might look on its surface like an Alien retread, but it doesn't dole out the scares in artful, tensely conceived little pieces like that film... It's relentless, and voracious, with a kind of kitchen-sink bravado when it comes to jump scares. EDIT
Posted Jan 9, 2020
Mike Birbiglia: The New One (2019) Kathryn VanArendonk The New One is the kind of thing that makes you want to speak in superlatives. It's the most moving, most honest, most surprising and tender, and it's also wildly funny. EDIT
Posted Jan 7, 2020
The Breakfast Club (1985) David Denby [Hughes] understands adolescents as well as anyone who has ever made movies about them, and he has a fluent way with young actors. In this picture, his dramatic ideas may be cheesy, but Hughes still manages to create some excitement and laughs. EDIT
Posted Jan 2, 2020
Inserts (1975) John Simon The entire film is indecisive about how serious and even touching it wants to be under its farcical facade, or whether, in fact, it is just funkily absurd. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Vincent, Francois, Paul... and the Others (1974) John Simon Vincent, Francois, Paul and the Others is an undistinguished film that is nevertheless worth seeing for its performances. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Obsession (1976) John Simon De Palma's direction has its splashy slickness, but the people serve as mere props for the effects. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Swashbuckler (1976) John Simon Several fine performers are perversely miscast in this movie. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Lifeguard (1976) John Simon [Lifeguard] addresses itself with the most earnestly dogged idiocy to the profoundly existential question of whether its 32-year-old hero should retain his integrity and freedom by continuing to ply the unfettered trade of lifeguard. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
The Lost Man (1969) Judith Crist The emphasis is on the suspense story -- and we will, I suppose, have to settle for being grateful that it is wrapped in contemporary terms. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
The Chairman (1969) Judith Crist Idiotic. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
My Side of the Mountain (1969) Judith Crist That rare "family" film that deals with flesh-and-blood rather than fairy-tale or television soap opera people, that talks about today in timeless terms, that finds its comedy and its high adventure and its moments of truth in human experience. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Hello Down There (1969) Judith Crist The dolphins get all the lines. A pity they didn't write them. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
The Wild Bunch (1969) Judith Crist If you must see The Wild Bunch, be sure to take along a barf bag. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
The Boys of Paul Street (1969) Judith Crist Just plain tedious. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
The Maltese Bippy (1969) Judith Crist The film gets off to an absolutely hilarious start, a grand takeoff on movie credits and moviemaking. Then, alas, it settles down to a spotty sort of The Cat and the Canary comedy -- before coming up with one of the funniest finales on record. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Murmur of the Heart (1971) Judith Crist The performances are remarkable, with Lea Massari (remember the girl who disappeared in L'Avventura?) as the mother; Bdnoit Ferreux as the boy, and Daniel Gelin as the inhibited and inhibiting father, sheer perfection. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Punishment Park (1971) Judith Crist The most offensive of the recent Festival films I have seen to date. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Bunny O'Hare (1971) Judith Crist There are moments when you don't hear the clank and grind. But only moments. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
The Other (1972) Judith Crist If you have not read Tom Tryon's The Other, don't before you see the film made from this best-seller of a year ago. And if you have read it, prepare to find yourself quite uninvolved in the course of the movie. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Hammersmith Is Out (1972) Judith Crist Hammersmith Is Out is another of those heavy-handed "the criminally insane are running the world" parables that almost comes off -- but not quite, in spite of Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton giving their best performances of recent years EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
The Trial of the Catonsville Nine (1972) Judith Crist Its true success is that it works on many levels -- as courtroom drama, as a contemporary document, as a statement of conscience and, perhaps most important, as a challenge to your own courage when you witness that of the Catonsville Nine. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Malcolm X (1972) Judith Crist It stands as a vital record of a man of our time, that rare man who grew and changed and tempered his views to his intellectual maturity alone -- and never to the times. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
La Truite (1982) David Denby La Truite is Losey's most chic and empty film yet. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
WarGames (1983) David Denby Like a man drawn to the edge of a cliff by the lure of the abyss below, we're secretly obsessed by the apocalypse. Moralists may claim that WarGames is more exploitation than warning, but it's still an exciting, giddily entertaining movie. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Diner (1982) David Denby In conventional dramatic terms, little happens in Diner, but it offers a completed vision of life, ecstatic in its recovery of forgotten pleasures, melancholy in its knowledge of how small a chance these men ever had of claiming their freedom. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Heartbreakers (1984) David Denby How interesting is childishness in grown men? Less than Bobby Roth thinks. Yet Roth brings a natural filmmaker's intensity to the material. When I play this movie over in my head, I laugh at it, but I'm still enjoying it, too. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Desperately Seeking Susan (1985) David Denby A few scenes are very funny, but the picture would have worked much better if Seidelman had thrown away half the dialogue and built some momentum. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Mississippi Blues (1984) David Denby This valedictory for the disappearing traditions of the South is a funny and stirring work. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019
Superman II (1980) David Denby Superman II is easily the best spectacle movie of the season. EDIT
Posted Dec 31, 2019