Los Angeles Free Press

Tomatometer-approved publication
Rating Title/Year Author
Countdown at Kusini (1976) Ruth Batchelor [Ruby Dee's] a fine actress and was wasted. EDIT
Posted Jul 9, 2020
Easy Rider (1969) Paul Schrader Easy Rider deals with the most important issues facing America -- and for that reason its superficiality is the more deplorable. EDIT
Posted Jun 30, 2020
Belle de Jour (1967) Paul Schrader Belle de Jour ranks with L'Age D'Or and Los Olvidados as a landmark not only of Luis Bunuel's career, but of the history of motion pictures. EDIT
Posted Jun 30, 2020
The Wild Bunch (1969) Paul Schrader The result is one of the strongest emotional kickbacks of any film. The Wild Bunch does for the emotions what Shane did for the intellect. EDIT
Posted Jun 30, 2020
Bad Girls (1968) Paul Schrader It passes over us with the full weight of its two hours. Les Biches is a sleeper, that is, it's soporific. EDIT
Posted Jun 30, 2020
The Sergeant (1968) Paul Schrader The failure of the Sergeant rests on Steiger. EDIT
Posted Jun 30, 2020
The Rise of Louis XIV (1966) Paul Schrader Rossellini has created a monument to Louis in a film which stands as great as Versailles in architecture. EDIT
Posted Jun 30, 2020
Support Your Local Sheriff! (1969) Paul Schrader Mindless Entertainment Department: veteran screenwriter William Bowers has written a funny script for a film with the suspiciously corny title of Support Your Local Sheriff. EDIT
Posted Jun 30, 2020
() Paul Schrader It is well photograped and at least three scenes stand in the memory as being very well cut. But after one trims away the peripheral elements... there is nothing left but a cheesecake film. EDIT
Posted Jun 30, 2020
The Learning Tree (1969) Paul Schrader The Learning Tree gives the viewer breathing room, an opportunity to both take it in and leave it. And considering the film's subject matter, that is a sizable achievement. EDIT
Posted Jun 30, 2020
Midnight Cowboy (1969) Paul Schrader Midnight Cowboy has two of the best performances of the year, by Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman, but also some of the worst direction. EDIT
Posted Jun 30, 2020
If... (1968) Paul Schrader The is an acute sense of disappointment about If, not only over the great film Anderson failed to create, but also the lesser film he passed by. EDIT
Posted Jun 30, 2020
() Richard Whitehall On the whole the rich possibilities of the subject are thinly realized. EDIT
Posted Jun 1, 2020
Fearless Frank (1967) Richard Whitehall Technically there is nothing wrong with the movie... but, in the final analysis, the work is as juvenile as the genre it is satirizing, not cutting enough, not funny enough, not imaginative enough. EDIT
Posted Jun 1, 2020
() Richard Whitehall [Heinosuke] Gosha's greatness as adirector is nowhere left in doubt. EDIT
Posted Jun 1, 2020
Inside North Vietnam (1967) Gene Youngblood Hawks and doves alike will benefit by seeing it. EDIT
Posted Apr 9, 2020
Laughter in the Dark (1969) George Kaplan By and large, [Tony Richardson's] direction is intelligent and disciplined. EDIT
Posted Apr 9, 2020
() Richard Whitehall Without thinking it to be in any way a masterpiece, I find Mailer's movie pretty sharp, a probing into the role of the police in contemporary society. EDIT
Posted Mar 17, 2020
Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) Ridgely Cummings It was a most uncomfortable experience. It was about as funny as a creeping case of cancer... Despite this carping I must admit that Dr. Strangelove was a memorable film, one worth seeing and one which took courage to make and even to exhibit. EDIT
Posted Feb 5, 2020
The World's Greatest Sinner (1962) Abby Kunkin If Mr. [Timothy] Carey plans to make more religious films of this type, Hell may really break loose in the art-film houses. EDIT
Posted Feb 5, 2020
The Cool World (1964) Norman Hartweg While Shirley Clarke's latest film, The Cool World... does not deal directly with the recent rioting that has turned Harlem into a shambles, it is nonetheless the most important document to date of the situation itself. EDIT
Posted Feb 5, 2020
Fail-Safe (1964) Merl Edelman It's a well done television play that somehow got on a large screen where its literate but talky script and excellent acting can't make up for the lack of action or monotony of pace that so bog it down. EDIT
Posted Feb 5, 2020
Topkapi (1964) Merl Edelman It's strictly entertainment, but Peter Ustinov and Robert Morley are worth it for fun even without the ingenious jewel robbery around which this colorful spoof focuses. EDIT
Posted Feb 5, 2020
Ashes and Diamonds (1958) Merl Edelman This honest film shows a greater degree of artistic and political freedom in Poland (at least in 1959) than we are led to expect. EDIT
Posted Feb 5, 2020
The Kitchen (1961) Merl Edelman Arnold Wesker's off-beat and interesting view of a restaurant kitchen as a microcosmic world tells some truths about us all. A good film, often hard to find. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Becket (1964) Merl Edelman Worth a look... for a single performance:... Peter O'Toole as Becket's king, Henry II. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Cleopatra (1963) Merl Edelman Worth a look.... for a single performance: Rex Harrison as Caesar. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Joy House (1964) Merl Edelman Though Joy House, with its pyramid of tricks, chases, surprises, secret panels - the lot - never quite thinks to poke the finger of fun at itself, viewers make no such mistake. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Zorba the Greek (1964) Merl Edelman [Director Michael] Cacoyannis' skills as a craftsman are considerable. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Girl With Green Eyes (1964) Frank Urbach Rita Tushingham is sheer delight as the girl. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Woman in the Dunes (1964) A. Fredric Franklyn Certainly the central inspiration, of going into the earth itself to dig out a story of man, is a compelling cinematic reach. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
36 Hours (1964) Merl Edelman Even when it becomes just another spy thriller, it's as well done as the best of the genre. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
The Americanization of Emily (1964) Merl Edelman Despite a title which smacks of war-bride sop, [the film] is in some ways the most impressive film since Strangelove. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Intentions of Murder (1964) Frank Urbach Film has a new poet. His name is [Shohei Imamura]. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964) Chris Breyer What makes Les Parapluies a delight is its almost total involvement with the cinematic medium; its delight in color, movement and gesture; the making of fantasy out of the most common objects of modern existence. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Nothing But a Man (1964) Byron Pumphrey A work of art. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Muriel (1963) Norman Hartweg An absorbing and beautiful film. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Marriage Italian Style (1964) A. Fredric Franklyn De Sica's latest is tricky, thin and dishonest. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Death Is a Woman (1967) Lewis Teague It is this feeling of freedom that pervades the entire film and makes it so exciting, so significant to the true nature of experiencing the full imact of the cinema. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
The Pawnbroker (1964) Frank Urbach It is our statement that Nazerman is as much Lumet's creation as Steigers: mood and visuals combine with the performance to present a screen creation wholly worthy of Emil Janning's work with Von Sternberg in Blue Angel. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
The Soft Skin (1964) Edward Zatlyn The film opens with a kind of urgency that never really lets up. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
The Knack, and How to Get It (1965) Edward Zatlyn The screenplay by Charles Wood (based on the play by Ann Jellicoe) is alive, written for the cinema with as many sight gags and visual trips as can be packed or stacked into the thin little story line. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Circle of Love (1964) Digby Diehl Has taken the plot material of [Arthur Schnltzler's play La Ronde] and turned it into a square dance. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Diary of a Chambermaid (1964) Shelley Burton Impressive in the film is the graceful, mature manner in which the characters subtly reveal the dramatics of the story. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Red Desert (1964) Don Campbell For the images, color, and the sound alone, Michelangelo Antonioni's The Red Desert is worth it. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
The Collector (1965) Don Strachan The Collector's weaknesses are not enough to destroy an essentially good film. It passes the ultimate critical test in that it compels a fair degree of involvement. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
The Brig (1964) Chris Breyer An intriguing and often powerful exercise in ritualized barbarity. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Nuit et brouillard (1955) Miriam Tamir Alain Resnais leaves no room for questions or remarks. It's all there. In word. In image. In color, and in Black and White, at the Los Feliz. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
Attack and Retreat (1965) Michael Greenwald A profound realism permeates all, proving it's still a viable style, in case this is being disputed. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020
The Leather Boys (1963) John Armstrong In a film so obviously well thought out it is a shame to see excellence sacrificed to shallow writing. EDIT
Posted Feb 4, 2020